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Arch of Titus Jerusalem Booty 2

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Arch of Titus Jerusalem Booty 2
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View looking southeast at the relief carved on the southern pier of the Arch of Titus in Rome that depicts the procession of booty taken from Titus’ capture of Jerusalem in A.D. 70.

From right to left note the representation of a Triumphal Gate with two chariot groups on top of it.  To the left of this are two crossed (silver) trumpets taken from the Temple in Jerusalem.  Faintly visible (enlarge image) is a representation of one of the tables that held the “show bread” in the Holy Place of the Temple.

On the left side of the image one of the seven–branched candlesticks (menorah) from the Jerusalem Temple.  This is one of the earliest representations of a menorah in existence!

Also visible are several rectangular placards on poles.  These probably were painted with inscriptions naming either cities or peoples conquered.

This booty was deposited in Vespasian’s “Temple of Peace!”


The Arch of Titus (Roman Emperor A.D. 79–81) is located in Rome on the east end of the ancient Forum, as one walks along the Via Sacra toward the Colosseum.  The emperor Domitian (A.D. 81-96) built it soon after the death of Titus.

The arch commemorates the victories of Vespasian (A.D. 69–79) and Titus—particularly their putting down the Jewish revolt in Judea and the capture of Jerusalem in A.D. 70.

It is well to remember that this commemorative arch was built by Domitian, to commemorate a triumphal parade of the previous emperor Vespasian and his son Titus who was the actual conquer of Jerusalem, and who would eventually become emperor himself.

The sequence of emperors was Vespasian, Titus, and then Domitian.